Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘right to work for Delaware’

Rebecca Friedrichs. (Photo by Christi Ransom)

photo Christi Ransom, Washington Post

The National Right to Work Committee has been very active in the national movement to bring Paycheck Protection to American workers. One case the entire nation is following is Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, a case which could essentially place Right to Work/Paycheck Protection as protected by the U.S. Constitution for every state everywhere, including states like Delaware which currently do not guarantee a worker’s right to not pay union dues and not receive union benefits.

The video below is from YouTube and discusses the case, as well as the implications depending on how the Court could rule.

here’s the link to their blogpost in full in full:

http://www.nrtw.org/en/blog/right-work-friedrichs-01122016

Which way will the court rule? What would happen if all of Paycheck Protection became national law?

Read Full Post »

As is common in most years, domestic policy trumps all other issues. While the Republicans believe immigration is the top issue to run a winning campaign, Democrats believe the minimum wage issue is a winner for their candidates.

Democratic strategist Donna Brazile wrote an op-ed where she believes millions of low-wage employees could form a very powerful voting bloc:

Shawanda Wilson, who works at Taco Bell in Tampa, Fla. and makes $8.25 an hour, has never voted before. Neither has Tonya Harrington, a 42-year-old home care worker from Durham, NC, who makes $7.25 an hour. Both say they’ve steered clear of voting booths not because they don’t care, but because they’ve felt politicians don’t speak for them.

That’s changing. Buoyed by $15 victories across the country, including in New York, Los Angeles and Seattle, fast-food cooks and cashiers, home care workers and child care workers like Shawanda and Tonya recognize that by joining together in a movement, they can make politicians care. Now they are vowing to head to the polls, and they’re hoping to bring with them the more than 60 million Americans movement organizers say are paid less than $15.

It’s not such a crazy thought. While recent ballot initiatives for $15 failed in Tacoma, Wash., and Portland, Maine, a recent poll of workers paid less than $15 an hour commissioned by the National Employment Law Project showed that 69% of unregistered voters would register to vote if there was a candidate who supported $15 and a union; and 65% of registered voters paid less than $15 an hour would be more likely to vote if there was a candidate who supported $15 and union rights.

We know the economic recovery has not been uniform, and nearly all the gains have gone to the top 1%, or the top 0.1%, as Bernie Sanders likes to remind us. The median income for an American worker is about $28,000, and overall household income has decline almost $2,000 since 2008. Meanwhile, millions of children live in poverty and cannot get enough food to eat or access to a great education. From an emotional standpoint, raising the minimum wage would lift millions out of poverty. While $15 an hour won’t do much in New York City, $15 an hour in most part of the country would be a big boost.

The minimum wage comes down to basic math. The argument for one is true if businesses were sitting on a pile of unspent money and were hoarding it instead of investing in their company. Since few, if any, businesses (particularly small- and medium-sized businesses) are run by heartless pigs who just want to hoard cash, the fact that they may not pay $15 an hour is more a symptom of: a favorable job market for employers; and that paying $15 an hour to all employees would require prices on good and services to go up, or to layoff some employees to pay for the others to have a higher wage. Not sure how the laid-off employees will feel about being sacrificed for the “greater good”.

Today is #GivingTuesday, a break from the spending we do for the holiday season. Consider supporting  CRI this holiday season to support out 2016 objectives for Education Savings Accounts and a Paycheck Protection law for all workers in Delaware. Visit https://www.caesarrodney.org/index.cfm?ref=90905 to help us meet our end of the year fundraising goals.

Read Full Post »

rightwisconsin.com

Today’s News Journal article “Seeking Delaware manufacturing jobs, GOP targets unions” talks about the concept of a “right to work zone”, which differs from Right to Work in that RTW laws covers whole state while a RTW zone covers only a specific geographic area. Senator Greg Lavelle has proposed one this year; he did the same last year.

As expected, the unions were out in full force against it:

“Sam Lathem, president of the Delaware AFL-CIO, the umbrella organization representing Delaware unions, called Lavelle’s legislation a “desperate reach” that would lead to lower wages.

“We need to find a way to re-create and grow the middle class. Right-to-work isn’t going to do that,” Lathem said.”

The News Journal article pointed out the problem, though whether John Starkey intended to do so is another idea.

“Now Republicans are reviving a proposal they hope will revitalize Delaware manufacturing. But the plan, which would make it harder for unions to organize, is controversial and deeply polarizing in a state where the governor’s office and the General Assembly are controlled by Democrats, who still count union members among their staunchest base supporters.

Markell, a Democrat, appears poised to oppose the legislation. A spokeswoman said available studies on whether right-to-work legislation creates jobs are “inconclusive at best.”

“Gov. Markell remains focused on efforts that employers tell him are most important for job and economic growth, such as providing training for a skilled workforce and spurring innovation,” spokeswoman Kelly Bachman said.”

To quote from Hamlet, “Ay, there’s the rub.” You can see very quickly why even just a zone- not the whole state, but an area to try this idea out- is considered a threat to organized labor and those who benefit from it.

Here’s the summary of the Law, SB 54:

“This Act allows the Director of the Delaware Economic Development Office to create right-to-work zones as part of its inducements to bring new businesses to Delaware and requires these zones to be offered for manufacturing businesses hiring at least 20 employees. It also exempts those manufacturing businesses from their gross receipts taxes for their first 5 years.”

Let’s talk about these zones. Suppose GM’s former plant on Boxwood road was turned into a right to work zone, along with say 1000 square acres surrounding the plant’s legal boundaries. Only businesses locating in these zones would be able to receive the benefit, and with only 1000 square acres there would be a limit. However, those businesses which do receive a space in the RTW zone would be able to avoid the problems which modern day labor unions bring: namely, the political activity (including which many union members may not agree with) and the pressure to give workers more money and benefits even if the company is unprofitable or if doing so makes the company unprofitable. They can make an effort to grow manufacturing and if the effort succeeds, then more zones can be replicated, or perhaps if the General Assembly and Governor see the benefit of one, they can enact a RTW law for the entire state.

On the chance the law is not beneficial, or even proves detrimental, the zone can be removed and the rest of the state is unaffected or the law can be repealed if the zones are a failure.

Now, other factors will affect the success or failure of these zones. Notice that the gross receipts tax would not apply for five years. This is because our state’s gross receipts tax is a job-killer; businesses who meet a certain income threshold pay a tax on all revenue over the threshold, not counting profit and loss. So even if your business has a bad year, you still get socked with higher taxes.

Electricity is expensive in this state, about 23% higher than the national average. Plus, the crime reputation for Wilmington, and to a lesser extent Dover, absolutely gives a negative vibe to outsiders looking to relocate a business or build a new factory. Don’t let anyone tell you Wilmington’s crime problem isn’t hurting the reputation of the entire state.

But RTW zones might give the state a chance to attract capitalists without having to “invest” (subsidize) large businesses to move here, because most of the biggest “investments” go to major companies like Fisker, Bloom, Kraft, etc.. If you owned a casual sit-down restaurant, and the only way you could get customers is to pay them anywhere from $30-50 to get them into the store, who is going to look at customers coming in and say “yes, this is a successful restaurant” just because a few customers are inside your restaurant now?

We hope the state will look at ways to improve our economic climate, to attract businesses and “job creators” of all types, from start-ups to established companies, from sole proprietorships to multinational corporations, to anyone who has job opportunities for Delawareans and is willing to invest in our state for the long-term. These goals are achievable, they work, and they offer a new chance to get our economy going again.

By the way, the courts have found right to work zones are legal. What is not currently legal (and is being challenged) is right to work at the County/City level. This is due to how local government entities are structured.

Lastly, if you need more proof that manufacturing in Delaware is in serious trouble:

Delaware manufacturing employment

1990: 43,200

1991: 48,600

1992: 44,800

1993: 44,100

1994: 44,200

1995: 44,300

1996: 39,700

1997: 41,5002

1998: 43,100

1999: 44,400

2000: 41,300

2001: 39,000

2002: 38,300

2003: 35,000

2004: 34,900

2005: 33,500

2006: 35,000

2007: 33,700

2008: 32,300

2009: 29,900

2010: 26,800

2011: 25,600

2012: 25,600

2013: 25,600

2014: 25,600

2015: 25,800

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Yes, we have lost roughly 40% of our manufacturing jobs, and most of these workers are NOT in a private sector labor union, which has even lower numbers. Given the situation, what can and should unions do to keep their members supporting their unions? How could union leaders improve their offering which helps both workers and employers?

In our next blogpost, we’re going to introduce a new concept called “Union Economies”. This idea is pretty interesting, and it comes from our friends at the Mackinac Center.

Read Full Post »