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Posts Tagged ‘Pew Research’

The Pew Research Center recently published a report called “The American Middle Class is losing ground.” They cite data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors to determine household incomes to suggest the Americans who once made up the majority of hardworking, moderate income Americans comprise now less than half the adult population.

Share of adults living in middle-income households is falling

Approximately 120.8 million American adults are considered “middle class”, which Pew defines as their income is 50-66% the media income based on household size.

Who is “middle income” and “upper income”?

 

These findings emerge from a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. In this study, which examines the changing size, demographic composition and economic fortunes of the American middle class, “middle-income” Americans are defined as adults whose annual household income is two-thirds to double the national median, about $42,000 to $126,000 annually in 2014 dollars for a household of three.3 Under this definition, the middle class made up 50% of the U.S. adult population in 2015, down from 61% in 1971.

Basically what’s happened is that those who once comprised the solid middle class of Americans- people who made enough to live comfortably but not enough to live luxuriously- had eroded. An increasing number of people either move into the top 10% (often known as the ‘professional’ class due to the high number of post-graduate degrees this group has earned) or into the bottom 30%, the ‘working poor’, families struggling to pay for even the most basic of expenses.

Older people, married couples and black adults improved their income status more than other groups from 1971 to 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black adults, many of whom start with little or nothing, have gained because the number who were well-to-do in 1971 was very small. Those with less than a bachelor’s degree have been hurt economically, as have younger adults and the unmarried (many of whom are young). Older, married White couples are the most likely to do well, though not having children has helped some married couples.

Predicting the future is tough, but the data suggests America already is a class-based system, and will become even more so as the earnings between college graduates (particularly those with a master’s or doctorate or equivelant) increase much faster than those near the bottom (fast-food workers, construction workers, those whose jobs can be more easily replaced via computer or immigration) can keep up, which will widen income inequality. The Minimum Wage argument will actually serve to hasten this gap, as business owners obtain the means and desire to replace so-called ‘low-skilled’ workers with automation.

The positive is that the number of ‘upper middle’ and ‘highest’ has grown as a percentage, which suggests that for some there is economic mobility that was not present in 1971.

What do you think? What does the data suggest about American earnings and our future?

 

 

 

 

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