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Posts Tagged ‘paycheck protection’

Rebecca Friedrichs. (Photo by Christi Ransom)

photo Christi Ransom, Washington Post

The National Right to Work Committee has been very active in the national movement to bring Paycheck Protection to American workers. One case the entire nation is following is Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, a case which could essentially place Right to Work/Paycheck Protection as protected by the U.S. Constitution for every state everywhere, including states like Delaware which currently do not guarantee a worker’s right to not pay union dues and not receive union benefits.

The video below is from YouTube and discusses the case, as well as the implications depending on how the Court could rule.

here’s the link to their blogpost in full in full:

http://www.nrtw.org/en/blog/right-work-friedrichs-01122016

Which way will the court rule? What would happen if all of Paycheck Protection became national law?

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As is common in most years, domestic policy trumps all other issues. While the Republicans believe immigration is the top issue to run a winning campaign, Democrats believe the minimum wage issue is a winner for their candidates.

Democratic strategist Donna Brazile wrote an op-ed where she believes millions of low-wage employees could form a very powerful voting bloc:

Shawanda Wilson, who works at Taco Bell in Tampa, Fla. and makes $8.25 an hour, has never voted before. Neither has Tonya Harrington, a 42-year-old home care worker from Durham, NC, who makes $7.25 an hour. Both say they’ve steered clear of voting booths not because they don’t care, but because they’ve felt politicians don’t speak for them.

That’s changing. Buoyed by $15 victories across the country, including in New York, Los Angeles and Seattle, fast-food cooks and cashiers, home care workers and child care workers like Shawanda and Tonya recognize that by joining together in a movement, they can make politicians care. Now they are vowing to head to the polls, and they’re hoping to bring with them the more than 60 million Americans movement organizers say are paid less than $15.

It’s not such a crazy thought. While recent ballot initiatives for $15 failed in Tacoma, Wash., and Portland, Maine, a recent poll of workers paid less than $15 an hour commissioned by the National Employment Law Project showed that 69% of unregistered voters would register to vote if there was a candidate who supported $15 and a union; and 65% of registered voters paid less than $15 an hour would be more likely to vote if there was a candidate who supported $15 and union rights.

We know the economic recovery has not been uniform, and nearly all the gains have gone to the top 1%, or the top 0.1%, as Bernie Sanders likes to remind us. The median income for an American worker is about $28,000, and overall household income has decline almost $2,000 since 2008. Meanwhile, millions of children live in poverty and cannot get enough food to eat or access to a great education. From an emotional standpoint, raising the minimum wage would lift millions out of poverty. While $15 an hour won’t do much in New York City, $15 an hour in most part of the country would be a big boost.

The minimum wage comes down to basic math. The argument for one is true if businesses were sitting on a pile of unspent money and were hoarding it instead of investing in their company. Since few, if any, businesses (particularly small- and medium-sized businesses) are run by heartless pigs who just want to hoard cash, the fact that they may not pay $15 an hour is more a symptom of: a favorable job market for employers; and that paying $15 an hour to all employees would require prices on good and services to go up, or to layoff some employees to pay for the others to have a higher wage. Not sure how the laid-off employees will feel about being sacrificed for the “greater good”.

Today is #GivingTuesday, a break from the spending we do for the holiday season. Consider supporting  CRI this holiday season to support out 2016 objectives for Education Savings Accounts and a Paycheck Protection law for all workers in Delaware. Visit https://www.caesarrodney.org/index.cfm?ref=90905 to help us meet our end of the year fundraising goals.

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image: innotribe.wordpress.com.

We published a podcast and a new article featuring CRI Policy Director Dave Stevenson where he criticized the EPA and DNREC for their continued efforts to enforce their unneeded regulations on Delaware residents and business owners of large industrial factories.

DNREC is another example of a government agency which exists primarily to exist. Right now they alternate between: warning of the dangers of Sea Level Rise with Apocalyptic warnings that most of Delaware will be underwater within 85 years (really 45 just to get the ball rolling) unless we “do something”. And the “something” ALWAYS is more government regulation over our lives; and creating new regulations so those who work there making regulations can assure the public they are, in fact, working.

It’s for this reason DNREC will not be pleased if you knew that we as a state have met all our EPA air quality requirements for 2030, and it’s only 2015. Due to a mixture of government regulation over pollutants, a switch from coal to natural gas and in some places nuclear power, and new innovations in technology which reduce pollutants produced, we have succeeded in making our air clean and safe to breath, even for those with respiratory problems. Normally, this would call for a celebration or a recognition of accomplishments, and a refocus by the government to make sure pollution levels are kept manageable- by both the public and private sector. In other words, act as an arbiter, which is what government is primarily there for, to take on a role there is no way the private sector could reasonably do fairly.

However, if you think DNREC’s leaders will shake hands, hold a pizza party for their employees, and close up shop, or at least reduce their budget, you’ve just fooling yourself (perhaps you’re waiting to be added to Delaware’s medical marijuana list?). This report, which is already out, will not be published by DNREC until next year. Expect them not to acknowledge our success at cleaning the air, and instead to continue pushing for new regulations on the private sector. The agency wants as few people to know that we’ve a) met our environmental goals and b) we really don’t have any major problems DNREC can do anything about. Admitting to either a or b above means admitting they can operate on a smaller budget. And you know how government agencies feel about having their budget cut.

The problem with what DNREC is doing is, the regulations are making Delaware an increasingly expensive place to live and for large industrial companies to maintain factories. Case in point, the closing of the Evraz Steel Plant, the Chemours Edge Moor plant and the fact that neither the GM nor the Chrysler plants were ever re-used by manufacturers to create the kind of blue-collar jobs Delaware once relied heavily on. Paycheck Protection for workers and tax code reform are important. But energy prices are a major, if not the primary, reason Delaware has lost about half of its private sector union membership and seen wages stagnate or decline for most private sector workers.

It’s a shame that good, hard-working people are going to suffer higher electric bills, reduced access to clean, alternative energies, and loss of job opportunities as businesses find operating in Delaware (without government handouts) simply too expensive all so certain state agencies can continue to justify their jobs and spending. However, unless DNREC backs down on some of their new proposed regulations, that’s what going to happen. And in that case, Dave will continue to double down on DNREC, and we at CRI will continue to stand for energy policies which keep our environment clean and lower government regulations.

CRI does not claim any credit for photo and we don’t endorse or not endorse Dominos Pizza.

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