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Posts Tagged ‘EPA regulation’

Sometimes we have to go beyond Delaware’s borders to protect the pocket books of our residents.  CRI has become a resource in the national fight to oppose taxes and regulations that misrepresents bad policy as critical to improving the environment.  We joined AEA in petitioning Congress to pass this important resolution.

Illegal tactics used by the EPA in drafting the so-called Clean Power Plan have been stayed by the US Supreme Court following a legal strategy encouraged by the CRI team.  The EPA called for a tax on carbon dioxide emissions to gain the agencies approval for individual state compliance plans.  EPA Director Gina McCarthy, and past Department of Energy Assistant Energy Secretary Charles McConnell both have stated the Clean Power Plan will have no impact on global warming but could add billions in energy costs.  McConnell describes how the plan is “all pain, and no gain”, how electric rates could see double digit increases, impact the poor and middleclass the most, and how the emissions savings would be replaced by three weeks output from China.

The resolution opposes the misguided plan to impose these unnecessary taxes.

 

David T. Stevenson

Director, Center for Energy Competitiveness

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image: innotribe.wordpress.com.

We published a podcast and a new article featuring CRI Policy Director Dave Stevenson where he criticized the EPA and DNREC for their continued efforts to enforce their unneeded regulations on Delaware residents and business owners of large industrial factories.

DNREC is another example of a government agency which exists primarily to exist. Right now they alternate between: warning of the dangers of Sea Level Rise with Apocalyptic warnings that most of Delaware will be underwater within 85 years (really 45 just to get the ball rolling) unless we “do something”. And the “something” ALWAYS is more government regulation over our lives; and creating new regulations so those who work there making regulations can assure the public they are, in fact, working.

It’s for this reason DNREC will not be pleased if you knew that we as a state have met all our EPA air quality requirements for 2030, and it’s only 2015. Due to a mixture of government regulation over pollutants, a switch from coal to natural gas and in some places nuclear power, and new innovations in technology which reduce pollutants produced, we have succeeded in making our air clean and safe to breath, even for those with respiratory problems. Normally, this would call for a celebration or a recognition of accomplishments, and a refocus by the government to make sure pollution levels are kept manageable- by both the public and private sector. In other words, act as an arbiter, which is what government is primarily there for, to take on a role there is no way the private sector could reasonably do fairly.

However, if you think DNREC’s leaders will shake hands, hold a pizza party for their employees, and close up shop, or at least reduce their budget, you’ve just fooling yourself (perhaps you’re waiting to be added to Delaware’s medical marijuana list?). This report, which is already out, will not be published by DNREC until next year. Expect them not to acknowledge our success at cleaning the air, and instead to continue pushing for new regulations on the private sector. The agency wants as few people to know that we’ve a) met our environmental goals and b) we really don’t have any major problems DNREC can do anything about. Admitting to either a or b above means admitting they can operate on a smaller budget. And you know how government agencies feel about having their budget cut.

The problem with what DNREC is doing is, the regulations are making Delaware an increasingly expensive place to live and for large industrial companies to maintain factories. Case in point, the closing of the Evraz Steel Plant, the Chemours Edge Moor plant and the fact that neither the GM nor the Chrysler plants were ever re-used by manufacturers to create the kind of blue-collar jobs Delaware once relied heavily on. Paycheck Protection for workers and tax code reform are important. But energy prices are a major, if not the primary, reason Delaware has lost about half of its private sector union membership and seen wages stagnate or decline for most private sector workers.

It’s a shame that good, hard-working people are going to suffer higher electric bills, reduced access to clean, alternative energies, and loss of job opportunities as businesses find operating in Delaware (without government handouts) simply too expensive all so certain state agencies can continue to justify their jobs and spending. However, unless DNREC backs down on some of their new proposed regulations, that’s what going to happen. And in that case, Dave will continue to double down on DNREC, and we at CRI will continue to stand for energy policies which keep our environment clean and lower government regulations.

CRI does not claim any credit for photo and we don’t endorse or not endorse Dominos Pizza.

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