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Archive for the ‘welfare reform’ Category

There are many things we’ve been critical of in regards to our state government, but here’s one area where the state earned high regards from one of our associates.

The Heartland Institute published their 2015 Welfare Reform Report Card  which shows a serious effort by the state to control need-based-aid, often referred to as “welfare”, and to get people who are able to work into jobs and not let them sit around collecting a check while they smoke Newport 100s while their left-wing Statist advocates claim we need to spend more “to help the poor”. There is no shame in providing a safety net for emergencies, such as homelessness, immediate unemployment, physical or mental disability (which prevents work or basic living functions), and hunger.

However, Statists from both major parties, but one in particular, have built a large web of government agencies which employ tens of thousands of public employees whose salaries and benefits drain the Treasury, and whose agencies continuously provide healthy individuals with a basic lifestyle that traps too many healthy, able-bodied people in a cycle of dependence, basically unable to get off the program to take care of themselves. They are then pressured to keep voting for those who redistribute the wealth, because those elected officials come into poor communities bearing horror stories of people dying in the streets, babies and pets going hungry, just before the world ends, if they vote for a candidate who wants to curb the perpetual welfare state. Have you noticed just how many able-bodied people who begin to receive these benefits keep earning them forever, unless encouraged to go find a job?

We at CRI believe human dignity and satisfaction best come from feeling a sense of worth to society as a whole, and being able to work a job which offers the ability to provide for oneself and one’s family, while also saving for future goals- a nice vacation, a house, a nice car, or whatever one desires and can earn through savings and interest. Even the argument over falling worker wages can be resolved using the principles of freedom- healthy market competition boosts worker’s wages by encouraging more hiring so there are more better-paying jobs than people, rather than what we have today, which is more people than better-paying jobs.

The Heartland Institute gave Delaware an overall grade of A- for welfare reform, going back to 2009 when Governor Markell was sworn in. We are ranked the 8th best state for welfare reform, dropping five places from 2008, largely because Delaware has done little to change its welfare reform policies while other states have improved theirs.

Some of their findings:

  • Delaware got top grades for work requirements and for “cash diversions”  (policies allowing case workers to give applicants lump sum cash payments to meet short-term needs), a B for service integration (organizing state human services in a way that allows coordinated, holistic, “one-stop” delivery of services and connects these services to the local community and employers), and C’s for aid limits and sanctions on those who don’t meet comply with eligibility requirements.
  • We spent $6,378 per recipient in 2013 (latest available data), and had just over 13,000 recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, which has declined 75% since 1996.
  • Where Delaware needs to improve is in anti-poverty measures. Close to 25% of Delawareans receive Medicaid, and sadly we have more children in poverty today than we had 20 years ago when the first set of welfare reforms was passed. Finding jobs for the unemployed poor has been an issue for Delaware, and Heartland ranked us 47th in finding jobs for those who are or were receiving TANF benefits. The only area where Delaware got strong ratings for anti-poverty was in having a low teen birthrate.

Heartland recommended Delaware adopt tougher time limits and do more to enforce them, and other eligibility requirements.

Overall, Delaware has done well in managing the welfare reform, in terms of having strong work requirements and helping people quickly and immediately, without losing control over monies disbursed. The state just needs to help people move off the bottom much faster than they are currently doing.

The photo of President Clinton is in the Public Domain and was taken from Wikipedia.

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